The Beautiful Side of the Pandemic

There’s life in my neighborhood! Whole families strolling together. Neighbors I’ve never seen before are at the park flying kites or running alongside their pooch. Neighbors normally preoccupied with work thoughts are waving to me and grinning from across the street as I walk.
My neighborhood is quieter than I’ve ever heard it. The silence is sumptuous, the peace washing over me like a warm rain shower. The roads around my house, usually so jam packed with the typical daily LA traffic are now largely empty. It feels real. It feels right.
The Killers performed live from a bathroom in a Jimmy Kimmel YouTube video and they were a revelation, truly talented, no need for autotune or effects. Just solid musicianship.
I took out my Guild and played a few songs, the first time I’ve done that in months. The next day, I broke out my Tascam which has been collecting dust in my closet the last few years. I cleared out an area of the garage, placed the Tascam on a makeshift table near an outlet. I’m dying to write songs and record again.

In the 2 weeks I’ve been in self-quarantine, I’ve made a beautiful mosaic vase and have gotten more sleep than ever. I’m turning in most nights around 10pm, sleeping until 6am and loving it.

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Handmade stained-glass mosaic vase by Angel La Canfora

I’ve reconnected with some old, long lost friends. We’ve checked in, touched base, expressed concern. You really find out who your friends are in times of crisis. I have some great ones.
Gone is my existential angst, my tendency towards self-destruction, replaced with an appreciation of every moment. Why can’t I always be like this?
Why can’t WE always be like this?

Funny, Isn’t It? A Poem…

How you endured drunk parents reeling
and a broken playground elbow.
A gas shortage, a drought.
Friends coming and going.
A living room apartment flood.
Then a house move or two or three.
You survived 1980’s Orange County.
Reebok shoes and shoulder pads,
John Hughes films and Duran Duran.
You went to college like a good girl.
Arrived on time for lectures
even when hungover.
You ate spinach salad
instead of pizza.
You quit cigarettes
to prolong your life.
You met a man
and fell in love.
You showered daily and exercised
on days when you didn’t want to.
You moved to London
and got married.
You returned to California
and divorced.
You said goodbye as you watched
your father die.
You survived car accidents
and bouts of flu,
thunderstorms
and sunburns,
a night in the hands
of a serial rapist.
You played guitar to
intoxicated crowds.
You danced at weddings,
volunteered for the Red Cross.
In Lost River, West Virginia,
yellow jackets stung your arm.
In Washington, D.C.,
you received a diagnosis.
In Big Bear you shivered through
a mountain blizzard.
In Vegas you throbbed from
the desert heat.
You worked your day job
until your nerves were frayed.
You quit and leapt state boundary
lines in search of a better life.
You got it, found peace
in coastal L.A.
Only to one day
find your very life threatened
by the careless, tossed-off
words of your country’s leader.
Funny, isn’t it?
-Angel La Canfora
  8/10/2017

How to Road Trip While Chronically Ill

I was asked how it is that with all my myriad medical issues that I’m able to venture out into nature solo on a regular basis and indulge in landscape photography. The short answer is planning! A longer, more detailed answer will follow below. But first, a little about my conditions. I have Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, type 3 – a rare, connective tissue disorder – along with secondary Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome – which is a long-winded way of saying that my blood pressure sometimes takes a nose dive, causing heart palpitations, dizziness, etc – and Mast Cell Activation Syndrome, an autoimmune disorder commonly found in people with EDS and POTS.
Hopefully these road trips tips will be helpful for those with EDS or other chronic conditions. What works for me won’t necessarily work for you, so please use these tips to inspire and help you figure out what might work for you in your particular circumstance.

Before the Trip;

Research – The day before and day of, I check weather forecasts, make sure the trip is even worth my while. Landscape photographers like interesting weather – clouds, the aftermath of storms, etc. I consult sunrise/sunset charts so that I can time my visits to the hour, for the best light and to minimize having to expend precious energy by waiting around. I check and recheck road/traffic conditions, looking for the least stressful route, not necessarily the most direct one. For example, I’d rather go ten miles out of my way if it means not driving through downtown L.A. during rush hour. I familiarize myself with my route and destination if I’m not familiar with it already – I study maps, figure out what kind of conveniences are along the way, pinpoint rest stops and check out where the best views will be.

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At Joshua Tree National Park. Photo by Angel La Canfora

Planning – Dealing with crowds or long lines is hard on me so I avoid tourist destinations such as national parks and landmarks on holidays. I prefer to shoot off-season photos anyway as they tend to be more interesting and dramatic. The day before departure, I fill up the gas tank, do laundry, take care of any errands so I don’t have to worry about it the day of the trip and tack on needless activities to my travel time.

Careful Packing – I bring items that will help me get through the day with as minimal pain as possible. Items such as;

  • Salty snacks and gallons of water to keep my blood pressure up.
  • An epi-pen in the event of anaphylactic shock.
  • A pillow for rest breaks.
  • Layers of clothing to accommodate abrupt weather changes.
  • Cash in the event I find myself at a truck stop whose CC reader is on the fritz – happens more often than you’d think!
  • 2 pairs of shoes, one for driving, one for hiking.
  • Common sense stuff everyone should have in their car when they head out into nature like a hat, a 1st aid kit, a flashlight, etc.

Day of Trip;

Pacing – Gently does it. At places like Lake Mead National Recreation Area or Joshua Tree National Park, I go on mini-hikes. I’ll park at a trail head, and walk for about 10-15 minutes round-trip. Back in the car, I take a quick break, then move on to the next trailhead. It may not sound like much but you’d be surprised at how much you can see in these short bursts!

Knowing my Limits – Most of my photo junkets are day trips, sometimes extending to two days but rarely more. Sustained physical activity is my enemy. I give myself plenty of time to reach my destination. If I don’t make it on time, if I get stuck in a traffic jam or experience car trouble or some other unforeseen issue, then que sera sera. I make the best of it and enjoy the journey, look for other stuff to see and do and keep my eyes peeled for photo opportunities.

I’ve been doing things this way now for the last 7 years and my success rate is high. I’ve luckily had very little go wrong over the years. When things have gone pear-shaped, most of the time it’s been due to my own carelessness, such as that time when I brushed up against a cholla cactus plant in Joshua Tree, puncturing my calf muscle in a half dozen places, and had to call it a day. <Shudder>

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Angel La Canfora at Joshua Tree National Park sans puncture wounds.

It all comes down to brains over brawn. Sure, I have chronic pain and an ever-present risk of complications but nature fills my soul, makes my life worth living. It’s worth it to me to put myself in harm’s way to be able see some breathtaking views and shoot photos that may one day wind up on magazine covers like this one in the spring issue of  Inlandia Journal.  Yet other photos may find their way into my Shutterstock portfolio .  I have to spend the following day after a road trip once back at home resting, engaging in as little physical activity as possible. So a one day road trip actually takes up 3 days all total. Which is why I don’t go too often. But once a month or so and I’m a happy gal!

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And while I have you on the line…

My desert photography and mosaics will be on display all month long in November at the Lost City Museum  in Overton, Nevada, located on the outskirts of Lake Mead. I’m very thrilled and honored to be exhibiting there, as it’s a historic museum in one of my most favorite places, the Mojave desert. Please swing by if you can!